Author Topic: Kids of today!  (Read 2242 times)

guest5513

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Kids of today!
« on: February 21, 2015, 20:22:00 PM »
I dont know if any of you feel the same or its just me..But when ever I show kids the retro consoles they just give me a look as if to say..."what is that" lol

I miss the 80s/90s years..

whats your thoughts guys?

 :69:

Offline Greyfox

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Re: Kids of today!
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2015, 21:14:52 PM »
Yes, totally agree, what they know about video games you could put in a matchbox, the kids of today seem to think if the run our of an ammo clip in Call of Duty it's the hardest game they've ever played or having their ass handed to them in Dragon Age, they run home to mama.

But no not us, the generation of the 1980's and 1990's know only too well the level of skill required simple to not be show yourself up in front of your friends down the local arcade if you weer naff at a game, the skill to overcome some of the worse game play mechanics ever to grace due to the fault of the designer or programmer and still beat, why, that's gaming, not the rose tinted half strength boozed game play of today.

Games were so epically much harder that even thought you would get a mind blowing ending, the fact that you could sit there in your chair and gleam at the thought "I've beaten this bastardizing game" with a smile across your face for the rest of the day is something this generation will never truly know what it felt like.

Offline wyldephang

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Re: Kids of today!
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2015, 05:55:40 AM »
I don't see a lot of kids these days, but I think as a whole, they're hopelessly ignorant on the subject of video games. When I was younger, my parents introduced me to the Atari 2600, even though it predated my birth by an entire decade. I was introduced to music and cinema from the 1950s and '60s because my parents made sure to pass their culture onto me. If today's parents had bothered to do the same, maybe more children would understand what a Game Boy was, and why it was an important escape for countless children throughout the '90s. Maybe they'd understand the significance of growing up in the 1980s, when video games flourished, died, and flourished again and swept the world like an African brush fire; when music contained at its nucleus an artistic rather than purely commercial vision; when films had to tell a story in lieu of the cheap CGI distractions that ruin so many pictures today. I fear for the generation of children who believe that all they ever needed to understand about our art and culture are on Xbox One controllers or tucked away in volumes of Harry Potter. It's a very somber subject: the death of a culture. When you think of the wisdom of the ancients, so much of it has been lost to fires, purges, and war. Many authors from Epicurus to Menippus only survive in some distant anecdotal form. In a few decades, unless we pass on our history to our children, the Shigeru Miyamotos and Richard Garriotts will be neglected and forgotten. At that point, you could almost see the twinkle of the apocalypse.  :33:
- Ryan

Offline zapiy

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Re: Kids of today!
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2015, 09:13:14 AM »
Yeah my kids are pretty much like "what the hell is that" especially pre 16bit games. They like some of the retro titles I have purchased on the Xbox Live system, but overall I suspect they would rather be on Forza or something similar. Having said all that, Minecraft has introduced them into a retroesque world don't you think?
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Offline Ben

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Re: Kids of today!
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2015, 16:09:46 PM »
I have a nephew who is into retro gaming, although he's 21, so not exactly a kid.  I think anyone younger than that has a hard time appreciating old school 2D games,  Even then,I still argue with him about games, he likes when they add achievements to old games or let you cheat and break the difficulty (the new version of Final Fantasy VII has a level booster or something like that he was telling me about) and it drives me crazy.  I know it's a cliche at this point, but that whole "everyone gets a trophy mentality" kids were raised with over the last 20 years did have an effect.  I've given up on saying "The achievement is when you beat the game!"

Offline wyldephang

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Re: Kids of today!
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2015, 05:39:10 AM »
I was one of the achievement completionists from 2007 to 2011. I always wanted to unlock everything on the achievement list, and looking back, I couldn't even say why. I think I felt a personal sense of accomplishment for having done it, but most of the achievements come from random, meaningless tasks which most gamers wouldn't do unless there was a point value assigned to it. For instance, in Mega Man 2, I always begin the game with either Metal Man or Flash Man. But if the game were ported to the Xbox 360 and there were achievements for beating Quick Man's stage first, I would've probably gone for it, even though the actual activity would make no sense to me. I don't have that mentality today, and I play games for enjoyment and self-satisfaction only.
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Offline SnakeEyes

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Re: Kids of today!
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2015, 10:06:47 AM »
Quote from: "wyldephang"
I don't see a lot of kids these days, but I think as a whole, they're hopelessly ignorant on the subject of video games. When I was younger, my parents introduced me to the Atari 2600, even though it predated my birth by an entire decade. I was introduced to music and cinema from the 1950s and '60s because my parents made sure to pass their culture onto me. If today's parents had bothered to do the same, maybe more children would understand what a Game Boy was, and why it was an important escape for countless children throughout the '90s. Maybe they'd understand the significance of growing up in the 1980s, when video games flourished, died, and flourished again and swept the world like an African brush fire; when music contained at its nucleus an artistic rather than purely commercial vision; when films had to tell a story in lieu of the cheap CGI distractions that ruin so many pictures today. I fear for the generation of children who believe that all they ever needed to understand about our art and culture are on Xbox One controllers or tucked away in volumes of Harry Potter. It's a very somber subject: the death of a culture. When you think of the wisdom of the ancients, so much of it has been lost to fires, purges, and war. Many authors from Epicurus to Menippus only survive in some distant anecdotal form. In a few decades, unless we pass on our history to our children, the Shigeru Miyamotos and Richard Garriotts will be neglected and forgotten. At that point, you could almost see the twinkle of the apocalypse.  :33:


Oh FFS sake get of you pretentious high horse. As much as you dislike it, kids are doing nothing wrong.

Who gives a crap if they don't know their history, this is their time, and they are entitled to enjoy it. I started with a NES as my first console. Did I know what intellivison or colecovision or what pong consoles were, no did I crap. I watched films in the 80's, did I learn the history and the classics of the 60's, no I did not. I started reading comics in the 80's, did I have to go back and learn about the golden age era of comics, no.

Kids start of and enjoy what they know, when they get a bit older they may well develop an interest in the history, but kids live in the here and now and always have done, same with most of us. Its no different now to the past 20-3- years.

guest5555

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Re: Kids of today!
« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2015, 20:55:26 PM »
I'm 14, and my presence here on this forum says enough. Not ALL of us are like that. Just most.

Offline TrekMD

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Re: Kids of today!
« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2015, 00:42:06 AM »
Quote from: "Jixson"
I'm 14, and my presence here on this forum says enough. Not ALL of us are like that. Just most.
:)
Going to the final frontier, gaming...


Offline hamie96

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Re: Kids of today!
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2015, 01:06:30 AM »
Retro Collecting is coming back. I wouldn't be surprised to see a majority of kids wanting to collect old NES/Genesis/SNES games in a few years.

Offline wyldephang

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Re: Kids of today!
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2015, 01:28:41 AM »
Quote from: "SnakeEyes"
Who gives a crap if they don't know their history, this is their time, and they are entitled to enjoy it. I started with a NES as my first console. Did I know what intellivison or colecovision or what pong consoles were, no did I crap. I watched films in the 80's, did I learn the history and the classics of the 60's, no I did not. I started reading comics in the 80's, did I have to go back and learn about the golden age era of comics, no.

Kids start of and enjoy what they know, when they get a bit older they may well develop an interest in the history, but kids live in the here and now and always have done, same with most of us. Its no different now to the past 20-3- years.

Maybe that was your experience, SnakeEyes. Mine was clearly different. My parents felt it was important to share their culture with me from a young age without holding me back from enjoying the things the kids my age were enjoying. So, I had the jazz music, but I had Metallica and MTV too. It's not as if they restricted me from the entertainment of the day. Looking back, I'm grateful that my parents spent as much time with me as they did. If you don't think it's a parent's responsibility to pass these things onto their children, then I have to disagree.
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Offline SnakeEyes

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Re: Kids of today!
« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2015, 08:35:24 AM »
No, I don't think they have to. Let kids be kids. they have a short enough time to enjoy themselves before real life hits anyway.

If they have a real interest in something they will learn more about it themselves.

Yes it probably different for me, but look at it this way. Has it stopped me from learning about the history of videogames, no it has not. let them develop a passion for something first then they will take it upon themselves to learn. Some will have no interest, but like many others on here, the ones who truly want to take an interest in the history of it all will do it all by themselves.

Offline WiggyDiggyPoo

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Re: Kids of today!
« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2015, 13:25:50 PM »
If I had my way I'd ban kids from retro events and things like Eurogamer. Bloody things just get in my way lol

guest5555

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Re: Kids of today!
« Reply #13 on: March 22, 2015, 15:00:56 PM »
I believe my first exposure to retro games was when I was 9 years old, helping my grandma clean out my mom's childhood closet at her house.

I dug up an Intellivision, and thought it was a radio.

I can't remember if it worked or not. After that, I became fascinated by retro electronics.

guest5555

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Re: Kids of today!
« Reply #14 on: March 22, 2015, 15:02:48 PM »
Quote from: "SnakeEyes"
No, I don't think they have to. Let kids be kids. they have a short enough time to enjoy themselves before real life hits anyway.

If they have a real interest in something they will learn more about it themselves.

Yes it probably different for me, but look at it this way. Has it stopped me from learning about the history of videogames, no it has not. let them develop a passion for something first then they will take it upon themselves to learn. Some will have no interest, but like many others on here, the ones who truly want to take an interest in the history of it all will do it all by themselves.
I agree. There was no pressure from my parents to become interested in retro games. In fact, they thought buying a 20 year old console was a stupid idea.

 

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