Author Topic: The NES and the UK - What really happened?  (Read 17451 times)

Offline SnakeEyes

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 192
  • Karma: 1
    • View Profile
Re: The NES and the UK - What really happened?
« Reply #165 on: November 01, 2013, 17:40:31 PM »
I hate the way the NES is portrayed as a savior of gaming, especially as we were blissfully unaware of a "crash" because we were all to busy enjoying out 8bit computers.


But do you know what pisses me off just as much, people who use this skewed viewpoint to constantly call the NES shite or rubbish. The Fanboys claiming it saved gaming is not the machines fault and hating on a machine because ot that is just as pathetic as the view that it saved gaming. Its a great machine and has great games.

there are some of those people on here who will not allow a good word to be said about the NES simply because they hate this biased viewpoint.

Offline TrekMD

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 23288
  • Country: us
  • Karma: 88
    • View Profile
    • http://plus.google.com/+EugenioAngueira
Re: The NES and the UK - What really happened?
« Reply #166 on: November 01, 2013, 21:22:48 PM »
In the US, given that we did have a crash of the video game industry, Nintendo with its NES has always been perceived as the savior of the video game industry.  The NES managed to successful where every other system failed in the US, so it is not hard to see people have this perception.  As far as I am concerned, Nintendo revived the video game industry in the US.  Clearly Nintendo did something right in that market.  I was not aware of how different things were in Europe until I became more involved in forums, so I can see how people not from the US would see the notion of the NES as a savior of the video game industry as some sort of joke.  After all, the system was not successful in every market (certainly not in Europe, where the SMS became "it").  I think that had Sega been the successful company in the US, instead of Nintendo, the SMS might have been perceived in the way the NES is perceived.

Going to the final frontier, gaming...

Offline TL

  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 13398
  • Karma: 1
    • View Profile
Re: The NES and the UK - What really happened?
« Reply #167 on: November 01, 2013, 21:41:16 PM »
The thing is the NES hardware isn't particularly impressive, it suffers from muddy colours and terrible sprite flicker for a start. It was let competent than it's rivals from a technical perspective but was certainly better supported from a software perspective. There is no doubting the NES has some amazing games, it bloody well should do given how many there are, but is it a good console from a technical/hardware perspective - no, not really.

Offline TrekMD

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 23288
  • Country: us
  • Karma: 88
    • View Profile
    • http://plus.google.com/+EugenioAngueira
Re: The NES and the UK - What really happened?
« Reply #168 on: November 01, 2013, 21:44:39 PM »
Yep, it may not have the best hardware but it did have great marketing in the US.  We've discussed this before.  Though the SMS has better hardware, its marketing was lacking in the US market.  It, therefore, did not do so well.  Goes to show that having good marketing is sometimes more important than having good hardware.  Sega obviously realized this (good marketing) when they launched the Genesis. 

Going to the final frontier, gaming...

Offline TL

  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 13398
  • Karma: 1
    • View Profile
Re: The NES and the UK - What really happened?
« Reply #169 on: November 01, 2013, 21:47:59 PM »
Quote from: "TrekMD"
Yep, it may not have the best hardware but it did have great marketing in the US.  We've discussed this before.  Though the SMS has better hardware, its marketing was lacking in the US market.  It, therefore, did not do so well.  Goes to show that having good marketing is sometimes more important than having good hardware.  Sega obviously realized this (good marketing) when they launched the Genesis.

Yep, very true. It's actually quite rare that the best system has won a console or computer generation - it's nearly always the best marketed one.

Offline Katzkatz

  • Reviewer
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 686
  • Karma: 2
    • View Profile
Re: The NES and the UK - What really happened?
« Reply #170 on: November 22, 2013, 16:51:28 PM »
My general impression is that the NES wasn't a big sales success in the UK.  In comparison, the Master System seemed to sell like hot cakes.  I didn't know anyone who owned one, but I knew quite a few Master System owners.  I can't seem to remember a lot of advertising for it - again, compared to the Master System.  I don't know if that affected it? 

In contrast, the SNES seemed very successful.  I do remember lots of advertising for that.  There was the whole Mario Kart and SF: II stuff.  I knew quite a few SNES owners - although funnily they had never owned a NES beforehand. 

Offline stonemonkeylives

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 77
  • Karma: 1
    • View Profile
Re: The NES and the UK - What really happened?
« Reply #171 on: February 27, 2015, 17:12:16 PM »
To be honest I was still fairly young when I got a NES, maybe 11/12yo, but I loved it. It was my first games console, we had a ZX Spectrum 2 before that, but when I got my NES I was in awe.  Now granted it had its flaws and I was the first kid on my street to get one (think within 3 to 6 months there were 3 of us who had one), so I didn't play many of the games at first but the ones I did have, I played to death.

As I say I'm not delusional enough to believe it was the best system of the day but for me personnally, I thought it had the best games of the day. And that is why I hold the NES in such high regard, don't get me wrong though I have spent many an hour arguing this with my friends who are Sega fans. But for me SMB3 is the best platformer ever on an 8bit machice, Zelda is the best RPG/adventure game and Mega Man 3 is second only to Zelda: A Link to the Past.

Now as to the high demand for the games and console these days, I think is mainly due to two types of "collectors" (I use the term collectors loosely for a reason), partially because of people who never played or owned the games and console the first time round. A lot of my friends for example want a NES because they had a SMS or an Atari or an 8bit computer the first time round and want to play the classic games they didn't get to play originally, which is great and to be encouraged. The rest is due the to people reading stupid articles online or in the newspapers on how much your old stuff is worth, not once mentioning in said articles that to fetch those nose bleed prices they need ro be mint and even then it is over inflated, who think if they buy a NES and some of the well known games it's an investment for their retirement or some crap. This then pushes the prices up and then other stupid people see how much these things go on eBay and start to snap things up too in the hopes of making a profit. Now I know this isn't just an issue on the NES but I think it's most prominent on that console and this then causes a domino affect that makes life for people like us, who collect or people who genuinely want try the games out and play them, really difficult.

Jeremy

Offline MadCommodore

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 77
  • Karma: 0
    • View Profile
Re: The NES and the UK - What really happened?
« Reply #172 on: December 21, 2015, 22:48:50 PM »

Offline Greyfox

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4755
  • Country: ie
  • Karma: 30
    • View Profile
    • http://www.atarigamer.co.uk
Re: The NES and the UK - What really happened?
« Reply #173 on: December 22, 2015, 12:56:01 PM »
Wow, that was a great read fella  :113:

Offline onthinice

  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3739
  • Karma: 38
    • View Profile
Re: The NES and the UK - What really happened?
« Reply #174 on: January 01, 2016, 12:41:46 PM »
Agree, a great read.

I agree the C64 version of games had the better ports but load times and overheating power bricks caused plenty of lost game time. Had a friend who played Pirates so much on his C64 that he finally had to buy a small house fan to cool the Commodore 64 power brick to keep it from overheating, always called the power supply a brick for its size and weight.

For me in the States, the NES was a must because my C1541 was wearing out. My thought was the 1541 II was good but not worth the investment over the original. The 1571 was out of stock when I had extra money and in stock when cash stripped. I was tired of load times from a noisy disk drive and the NES had all the same ports. Maybe watered down but games were easier to jump in to and play. Another reason for choosing the NES was my age, growing up brought other issues which meant less time for gaming so consoles were the better choice.

I am a Sega fan but even ports for its 16-bit were watered down. Buck Rodgers was still better on the Commodore 64. Pirates had better graphics over the NES and C64 but lacked something compared to the Commodore version. One plus with 16-bit as well was load times were minimal and usually just at the title screen.

Not trying to knock the C64 and not much knowledge of the later computers mentioned but did load times ever become a complaint in the UK?

Offline stonemonkeylives

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 77
  • Karma: 1
    • View Profile
Re: The NES and the UK - What really happened?
« Reply #175 on: March 01, 2016, 18:16:05 PM »
Quote from: "MadCommodore"
It certainly didn't have the best games of the day.  To say Zelda is the best 8 bit RPG shows ignorance in the extreme, ToL plays better, looks better, sounds better and cost four times less. Let me guess you never even heard of it though.

What I gather from your comment and username is that you are quite bias towards consoles.

Had you actually read my post properly, you would have seen it wasn't ignorance that made me write that sentence but personal opinion; I know the insanity of one's own opinion!

Just to clarify, I have heard of Times of Lore, I have even played it. Though that was a long time ago and not very in depth, to say it is the best RPG is as you call it "ignorance", what about the Ultima series or Wizardry or the early SSI games  like The Wizard's Crown?

I don't claim to be suitably qualified on this topic or on others within our hobby but this post is about the NES, in a thread about Nintendo hardware and my comment reflected my experience and personal opinion on such.

Jeremy.

Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk

Offline zapiy

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Posts: 12772
  • Country: england
  • Karma: 71
    • View Profile
Re: The NES and the UK - What really happened?
« Reply #176 on: March 01, 2016, 23:43:19 PM »
Great thread so far, be nice though chaps... Opinions are just that, we are all allowed them..

Never played Times of Lore, never been a huge RPG fan and I guess I always assumes Zelda to be the finest example of one of those types of games.
Own: Jaguar, Lynx, Dreamcast, Saturn, MegaDrive, MegaCD, 32X, GameGear, PS3, PS, PSP, Wii, GameCube, N64, DS, GBA, GBC, GBP, GB,  Xbox, 3DO, CDi,  WonderSwan, WonderSwan Colour NGPC

Offline stonemonkeylives

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 77
  • Karma: 1
    • View Profile
Re: The NES and the UK - What really happened?
« Reply #177 on: March 04, 2016, 09:31:57 AM »
I was discussing this topic with a friend at work, who also collects retro video games.

He is by no means a Nintendo fan, especially the NES and SNES but he did make some interesting points. Firstly, even though the NES came late to the UK compared to the Japanese and US markets, it still had a huge impact on UK gaming. It helped cement competition between formats for a lot of youngsters, yes there was the Spectrum vs. Commodore arguments but it paled in comparison to the school playground arguments of Nintendo vs Sega. Whether you were in the Sonic camp or Mario camp had quite the impact on playground politics.

Secondly the UK home computer scene, though brilliant and innovative, was going through its own crisis, over saturation of licensed games and bad ports meant that sales were beginning to suffer. Yes there were still good games coming out for the Commodore 64 and Spectrum but they were few and far between at this stage. Not to mention a lot of the great UK developers were getting poached by US and Japanese developers and publishers which certainly wasn't helping the UK home computer scene.

Thirdly, the NES and also the SMS were dedicated gaming machines. No longer did you have long waits while your favourite Dizzy game was loading, you simply slotted the game cartridge in and BAM! You were transported away to wonderfully new gaming world to explore. Even for the most dedicated computer fan this was something to behold and for me personally, who went from a ZX Spectrum +2 to a NES it was miraculous.

Finally, not specifically just in the UK but it is undeniable that without the NES or more importantly the Famicom (the NES was essentially a repacked Famicom), we wouldn't be playing games the way we do today. Console gaming would not have progressed the way it without the innovations the NES showcased. The D-Pad? Start and Select buttons? Not to mention others, yes other companies developed these further and in some cases improved on them but without Nintendo we could still have to deal with horrible pads like the Atari 5400 controller.

Some people have compared the NES to the Sega Mega Drive or the Amiga or Atari ST but personally I feel this is unfair, yes the NES came out in the UK near the end of the 8-Bit era but to compare it to these 16-Bit machines is similar to comparing the PS1 to the XBox. They were different generations of machines and would obviously be better in graphics, sound, etc.

Now these are just personal opinions and experiences of myself and my work colleague but after re-reading a lot of the comments on this thread I feel someone needs to make a counter argument to the mostly negative, though excellently made points thus far.

Jeremy


Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk